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A primary care NP provides primary care for a woman who has HIV. The woman asks the NP if she will ever be able to have children. The NP should tell her

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Week4 quiz

 

 1.

Question :

A primary care NP provides primary care for a woman who has HIV. The woman asks the NP if she will ever be able to have children. The NP should tell her:

 

   

none of the antiretroviral medications are safe to take during pregnancy.

 

   

she will need to take medications throughout her pregnancy and lactation.

 

   

there is no risk of disease transmission to a fetus if she complies with therapy.

 

   

strict adherence to antiretroviral therapy decreases her risk of transmitting HIV to the fetus.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 2.

Question :

The primary care NP teaches a patient about TMP/SMX before prescribing it to treat a urinary tract infection (UTI). Which statement by the patient indicates a need for further teaching?

 

   

“I will take this medication with food.”

 

   

“I should drink a full glass of water with each dose.”

 

   

“I should stay out of direct sunlight and use sunscreen.”

 

   

“I should report any ringing in my ears or a sore throat.”

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 3.

Question :

A patient is taking amantadine to treat a viral infection. The patient calls the primary care NP to report having blurred vision. The NP should:

 

   

question the patient about suicidal ideation.

 

   

tell the patient to stop the medication immediately.

 

   

counsel the patient to avoid driving until this subsides.

 

   

tell the patient to come to the clinic for an electroencephalogram.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 4.

Question :

A patient who has chronic pain and who takes oxycodone (Percodan) calls the clinic to ask for a refill of the medication. The primary care NP notes that the medication refill is not due for 2 weeks. The patient tells the NP that the refill is needed because he is going out of town. The NP should:

 

   

fill the prescription and document the patient’s explanation of the reason.

 

   

review the patient’s chart to see if this is a one-time or repeat occurrence.

 

   

call the patient’s pharmacist and report suspicion of drug-seeking behaviors.

 

   

confront the patient about misuse of narcotics and refuse to fill the prescription.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 5.

Question :

The parent of a 2-month-old infant who will soon begin daycare refuses the rotavirus vaccine (RV) because of fears of intussusception. The parent tells the primary care NP that the daycare is strict about preventing infants who have fever or gastrointestinal symptoms from attending. The NP should tell the parent that:

 

   

herd immunity will protect the infant from infection.

 

   

asymptomatic children can spread rotavirus infection.

 

   

the risk of intussusception is nonexistent with the newer vaccine.

 

   

the infant can be treated with antibiotics if rotavirus infection occurs.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 6.

Question :

A parent asks an NP which over-the-counter medication would be best to give to a 5-year-old child who has a viral respiratory illness with nasal congestion and a cough. The NP should recommend which of the following?

 

   

Diphenhydramine (Benadryl)

 

   

Increased fluids with a teaspoon of honey

 

   

Over-the-counter pseudoephedrine with guaifenesin (Sudafed)

 

   

An antitussive/expectorant combination such as Robitussin DM

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 7.

Question :

A 60-year-old patient comes to the clinic reporting a sudden onset of a painful rash that began the day before. The primary care NP notes a vesicular rash along a dermatome on one side of the patient’s back. The patient has a low-grade fever. The NP will prescribe:

 

   

varicella vaccine.

 

   

acyclovir (Zovirax).

 

   

metronidazole (Flagyl).

 

   

amantadine (Symmetrel).

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 8.

Question :

A woman who takes oral contraceptive pills develops vaginal candidiasis. The primary care NP prescribes a single dose of fluconazole. When counseling the patient about this drug, the NP should tell her:

 

   

that the drug is safe if she were to become pregnant.

 

   

that she may consume alcohol while taking this medication.

 

   

to use a backup contraceptive method for the next 2 months.

 

   

that she may need a lower dose of fluconazole because she takes oral contraceptive pills.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 9.

Question :

The primary care NP sees a patient who has a 1-week history of nasal congestion; red, watery eyes; cough; and a temperature ranging from 99.1° F to 100.5° F. The NP notes thin, white nasal discharge and an erythematous oropharynx without swelling or exudates. The NP should:

 

   

begin empiric antibiotic therapy to treat sinusitis.

 

   

reassure the patient that this is likely a viral infection.

 

   

prescribe antiviral medications and decongestants.

 

   

obtain a nasal culture and consider antibiotic therapy.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 10.

Question :

A patient refuses an influenza vaccine and asks the primary care nurse practitioner (NP) if the influenza medications will prevent him from getting influenza. The NP should tell the patient that although the influenza vaccine remains the best protection against influenza:

 

   

amantadine may be given prophylactically.

 

   

rimantadine is curative if given early after exposure.

 

   

zanamivir can be used before or after exposure to influenza A or B.

 

   

the influenza vaccine is unnecessary because antiviral medications are so effective.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 11.

Question :

A primary care NP sees a 6-month-old patient who has a persistent staccato cough. The NP is aware that there is a pertussis outbreak in the community. The NP should obtain appropriate cultures and treat empirically with:

 

   

erythromycin.

 

   

azithromycin.

 

   

clarithromycin.

 

   

telithromycin.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 12.

Question :

The primary care NP is performing a physical examination on a 6-month-old infant with cerebral palsy who has not had previous immunizations. The NP plans to begin vaccinations and should include:

 

   

DTaP vaccine.

 

   

TdaP vaccine.

 

   

TD vaccine only.

 

   

tetanus vaccine only.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 13.

Question :

A patient receives a hepatitis A vaccine and 4 weeks later develops symptoms of hepatitis. The patient has no history of exposure to blood or body fluids. The primary care NP should tell the patient that:

 

   

the symptoms are most likely caused by hepatitis B or C.

 

   

these symptoms are common adverse effects of the vaccine.

 

   

a prevaccine exposure to hepatitis A could be causing symptoms.

 

   

the vaccine is effective only after the second dose of hepatitis A vaccine.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 14.

Question :

The primary care NP is seeing a patient for a hospital follow-up after the patient has had a first myocardial infarction. The patient has a list of the prescribed medications and tells the NP that “no one explained anything about them.” The NP’s initial response should be to:

 

   

ask the patient to describe the medication regimen.

 

   

ask the patient to make a list of questions about the medications.

 

   

determine what the patient understands about coronary artery disease.

 

   

give the patient information about drug effects and any adverse reactions.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 15.

Question :

A primary care NP is preparing to prescribe a fluoroquinolone for a patient who has a history of alcohol abuse that has caused liver damage. The NP should choose:

 

   

norfloxacin.

 

   

levofloxacin.

 

   

gemifloxacin.

 

   

ciprofloxacin.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 16.

Question :

A primary care NP provides teaching for a patient who is about to begin taking levofloxacin tablets to treat an infection. Which statement by the patient indicates a need for further teaching?

 

   

“I should use sunscreen while taking this medication.”

 

   

“I should take this medication on an empty stomach.”

 

   

“I should use caution while driving when taking this medication.”

 

   

“I should take the tablet 2 hours before taking vitamins or an antacid.”

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 17.

Question :

A patient who has HIV is being treated with Emtriva. The patient develops hepatitis B. The primary care NP should contact the patient’s infectious disease specialist to discuss:

 

   

adding zidovudine.

 

   

changing to Truvada.

 

   

changing to tenofovir.

 

   

ordering Combivir and tenofovir.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 18.

Question :

A primary care NP prescribes a nitroglycerin transdermal patch, 0.4 mg/hour release, for a patient with chronic stable angina. The NP should teach the patient to:

 

Student Answer:

 

change the patch four times daily.

 

   

use the patch as needed for angina pain.

 

   

use two patches daily and change them every 12 hours.

 

   

apply one patch daily in the morning and remove in 12 hours.

 

Instructor Explanation:

To avoid tolerance, the patient should remove the patch after 12 hours. The transdermal patch is not changed four times daily or used on a prn basis. The patch is applied once daily.

 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 19.

Question :

A woman who is pregnant and is planning to breastfeed tells the primary care NP that she has never had chickenpox. The NP should:

 

   

administer the Varivax vaccine today.

 

   

administer the varicella-zoster immune globulin.

 

   

recommend the Varivax vaccine as soon as possible after her baby is born.

 

   

instruct her to receive the Varivax vaccine after her baby has been weaned.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 20.

Question :

A patient is taking sulfisoxazole. The patient calls the primary care NP to report abdominal pain, nausea, and insomnia. The NP should:

 

   

change to TMP/SMX.

 

   

tell the patient to stop taking the drug immediately.

 

   

reassure the patient that these are minor adverse effects of this drug.

 

   

order a CBC with differential, platelets, and a stool culture.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 21.

Question :

A patient is taking cefadroxil (Duricef) and comes to the clinic complaining of loose stools for several days. The primary care NP notes normal vital signs; warm, pink skin with elastic turgor; and moist mucous membranes. The NP should:

 

   

order tests for Clostridium difficile–associated disease (CDAD).

 

   

discontinue the cefadroxil.

 

   

reassure the patient that loose stools are common with antibiotics.

 

   

recommend consuming lactobacillus-containing foods to minimize diarrhea.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 22.

Question :

The primary care NP is preparing to prescribe a diuretic for a patient who has heart failure. The patient reports having had an allergic reaction to sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (Bactrim) previously. The NP should prescribe:

 

   

ethacrynic acid.

 

   

furosemide (Lasix).

 

   

acetazolamide (Diamox).

 

   

hydrochlorothiazide (HydroDIURIL).

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 23.

Question :

A patient comes to the clinic to have a Mantoux tuberculin skin test read after 48 hours. The primary care NP notes a 6-mm area of induration. The patient is a young adult with no known contacts and has never traveled abroad. The NP should:

 

   

repeat the test.

 

   

order a chest radiograph.

 

   

tell the patient the test is negative.

 

   

refer to an infectious disease specialist.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

0 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 24.

Question :

An adult patient has cellulitis. The patient is a single parent with health insurance who works and is attending classes at a local university. To treat this infection, the primary care nurse practitioner (NP) should prescribe:

 

   

cefdinir (Omnicef).

 

   

cephalexin (Keflex).

 

   

cefadroxil (Duricef).

 

   

ceftriaxone (Rocephin).

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 25.

Question :

A young woman will begin taking minocycline. The primary care NP should tell this patient to:

 

   

avoid taking antacids while taking this drug.

 

   

expect headaches while taking this medication.

 

   

always take the medication on an empty stomach.

 

   

use a backup form of contraception if currently taking oral contraceptive pills.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 26.

Question :

The primary care NP sees a 12-month-old infant who needs the MMR, Varivax, influenza, and hepatitis A vaccines. The child’s mother tells the NP that she is pregnant. The NP should:

 

   

administer all of these vaccines today.

 

   

give the hepatitis A and influenza vaccines.

 

   

give the Varivax, hepatitis A, and influenza vaccines.

 

   

withhold all of these vaccines until after the baby is born.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 27.

Question :

A patient who has migraine headaches has begun taking timolol and 2 months after beginning this therapy reports no change in frequency of migraines. The patient’s current dose is 30 mg once daily. The primary care NP should:

 

   

change the medication to propranolol.

 

   

increase the dose to 40 mg once daily.

 

   

obtain serum drug levels to see if the dose is therapeutic.

 

   

tell the patient to continue taking the timolol and return in 1 month.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 28.

Question :

An important difference between physician assistants (PAs) and NPs is PAs:

 

   

always work under physician supervision.

 

   

are not required to follow drug treatment protocols.

 

   

may write for all drug categories with physician co-signatures.

 

   

have both inpatient and outpatient independent prescriptive authority.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 29.

Question :

A patient who was recently hospitalized and treated with gentamicin tells the primary care NP, “My kidney function test was abnormal and they stopped the medication.” The patient is worried about long-term effects. The NP should:

 

   

monitor renal function for several months.

 

   

reassure the patient that complete recovery should occur.

 

   

refer the patient to a nephrologist for follow-up evaluation.

 

   

monitor serum electrolytes and serum creatinine and BUN.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 30.

Question :

The primary care NP is preparing to prescribe isosorbide dinitrate sustained release (Dilatrate SR) for a patient who has chronic, stable angina. The NP should recommend initial dosing of:

 

   

60 mg four times daily at 6-hour intervals.

 

   

40 mg twice daily 30 minutes before meals.

 

   

60 mg on awakening and 40 mg 7 hours later.

 

   

80 mg three times daily at 8:00 AM, 1:00 PM, and 6:00 PM.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 31.

Question :

An NP student asks the primary care NP about guidelines for using topical steroids. The NP should tell the student that:

 

   

evidence-based guidelines are available for each product.

 

   

standardized guidelines have been developed for use in children.

 

   

standardized guidelines may be found for disease-specific conditions.

 

   

evidence-based studies support limited corticosteroid use in pregnancy.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 32.

Question :

A patient comes to the clinic with a 3-day history of fever and a severe cough that interferes with sleep. The patient asks the NP about using a cough suppressant to help with sleep. The NP should:

 

   

order a narcotic antitussive to suppress cough.

 

   

obtain a thorough history of the patient’s symptoms.

 

   

suggest that the patient try a guaifenesin-only over-the-counter product.

 

   

prescribe an antibiotic to treat the underlying cause of the patient’s cough.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 33.

Question :

The primary care nurse practitioner (NP) sees a patient in the clinic who has a blood pressure of 130/85 mm Hg. The patient’s laboratory tests reveal high-density lipoprotein, 35 mg/dL; triglycerides, 120 mg/dL; and fasting plasma glucose, 100 mg/dL. The NP calculates a body mass index of 29. The patient has a positive family history for cardiovascular disease. The NP should:

 

   

prescribe a thiazide diuretic.

 

   

consider treatment with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor.

 

   

reassure the patient that these findings are normal.

 

   

counsel the patient about dietary and lifestyle changes.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 34.

Question :

A patient is taking an aminoglycoside and a cephalosporin. The primary care NP should consider _____ the dose of _____.

 

   

increasing; cephalosporin

 

   

decreasing; cephalosporin

 

   

increasing; aminoglycoside

 

   

decreasing; aminoglycoside

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 35.

Question :

A patient who was hospitalized for an infection was treated with an aminoglycoside antibiotic. The patient asks the primary care nurse practitioner (NP) why outpatient treatment wasn’t an option. The NP should tell the patient that aminoglycoside antibiotics:

 

   

are more likely to be toxic.

 

   

cause serious adverse effects.

 

   

carry more risk for serious allergic reactions.

 

   

must be given intramuscularly or intravenously.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 36.

Question :

An 80-year-old patient with chronic stable angina has begun taking nadolol (Corgard) 20 mg once daily in addition to taking nitroglycerin as needed. After 1 week, the patient reports no change in frequency of nitroglycerin use. The primary care nurse practitioner (NP) should change the dose of nadolol to _____ mg _____ daily.

 

   

40; once

 

   

80; once

 

   

20; twice

 

   

40; twice

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 37.

Question :

A sexually active woman is being treated for streptococcal pharyngitis. The patient takes oral contraceptive pills (OCPs). Which penicillin should the primary care NP prescribe for this patient?

 

   

Ampicillin

 

   

Penicillin V

 

   

Penicillin G

 

   

Dicloxacillin

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 38.

Question :

A primary care NP examines a patient who complains of chronic, intermittent watery eyes and runny nose. The NP notes cobblestone-like papillae inside the upper eyelid with nonerythematous conjunctivae. The NP should:

 

   

prescribe intranasal corticosteroids.

 

   

refer the patient to an ophthalmologist.

 

   

prescribe trifluridine ophthalmic eye drops.

 

   

apply fluorescein dye to examine the cornea.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 39.

Question :

A patient who has had a new onset of AF the day prior will undergo cardioversion that day. The primary care NP will expect the cardiologist to:

 

   

give clopidogrel after administering cardioversion.

 

   

administer cardioversion without using anticoagulants.

 

   

give warfarin and aspirin before attempting cardioversion.

 

   

give low-dose aspirin before administering cardioversion.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 40.

Question :

A patient has confirmed Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and the infectious disease specialist is treating the patient with doxycycline 100 mg orally for 7 days. The patient comes to the clinic for follow-up care with the primary care NP at the end of therapy and reports continued fever, headache, and myalgia. The NP will consult with the infectious disease specialist and order:

 

   

7 more days of doxycycline.

 

   

erythromycin 250 mg four times daily for 7 days.

 

   

amoxicillin 500 mg three times daily for 10 to 14 days.

 

   

hospital admission for intravenous chloramphenicol.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 41.

Question :

A patient has recently returned from travel in Central America and reports having seven to eight liquid stools each day with severe tenesmus. The primary care NP notes a temperature of 102° F. A stool specimen is Hemoccult positive with leukocytes present. The NP will:

 

   

order tests for Clostridium difficile.

 

   

prescribe tinidazole 2000 mg for 3 days.

 

   

give 750 mg of ciprofloxacin one time only.

 

   

order a stool culture and begin therapy with a fluoroquinolone.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 42.

Question :

The primary care NP sees a patient who has heart failure following an MI 6 months before this visit. The patient has been taking an ACE inhibitor, nitroglycerin, furosemide, and hydrochlorothiazide. The NP auscultates crackles in both lungs and notes pitting edema of both feet. The NP should prescribe:

 

   

mannitol.

 

   

metolazone.

 

   

acetazolamide (Diamox).

 

   

spironolactone (Aldactone).

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 43.

Question :

A patient receives a Mantoux tuberculin skin test as part of screening for a new job. The test is administered on a Friday, and the patient returns to the clinic the following Wednesday. The primary care nurse practitioner (NP) notes a 3-mm area of induration. The patient has no risk factors for tuberculosis (TB). The NP should:

 

   

repeat the test.

 

   

record the test as positive.

 

   

record the test as negative.

 

   

ask about previous TB exposure.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 44.

Question :

A patient with primary hypercholesterolemia is taking an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor. All of the patient’s baseline LFTs were normal. At a 6-month follow-up visit, the patient reports occasional headache. A lipid profile reveals a decrease of 20% in the patient’s LDL cholesterol. The NP should:

 

   

order LFTs.

 

   

order CK-MM tests.

 

   

consider decreasing the dose of the medication.

 

   

reassure the patient that this side effect is common.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 45.

Question :

A patient comes to the clinic with a history of fever of 102° F for several days, poor appetite, and cough. A sputum culture is pending, but Gram stain indicates a bacterial infection. The primary care nurse practitioner (NP) should:

 

   

begin empirical antibiotic therapy.

 

   

use a broad-spectrum antibiotic for initial treatment.

 

   

prescribe an antibiotic when culture and sensitivity results are known.

 

   

offer symptomatic treatment only unless the patient’s condition worsens.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 46.

Question :

A patient who has had two recent urinary tract infections is in the clinic with dysuria and fever. The primary care NP reviews the patient’s chart and notes that in both previous cases the causative organism and sensitivity were the same. The NP should:

 

   

treat the patient empirically without a culture.

 

   

order a microscopic evaluation of the urine and an antibiotic.

 

   

order a urine culture and treat empirically pending culture results.

 

   

order a urine culture and sensitivity and wait for results before treating.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 47.

Question :

The primary care NP sees a 65-year-old patient in October. The patient has a history of COPD and has not had any vaccines for more than 20 years. The NP should administer:

 

   

influenza and Td vaccines.

 

   

PCV 13 and influenza vaccines.

 

   

PPV 23, Td, and influenza vaccines.

 

   

PPV 23, influenza, and TdaP vaccines.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 48.

Question :

A primary care NP sees a patient who has fever, flank pain, and dysuria. The patient has a history of recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) and completed a course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) the week before. A urine test is positive for leukocyte esterase. The NP sends the urine for culture and should treat this patient empirically with:

 

   

gemifloxacin.

 

   

ciprofloxacin.

 

   

azithromycin.

 

   

TMP/SMX.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 49.

Question :

A patient has been taking trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP/SMX) for 14 days. The patient calls the primary care nurse practitioner (NP) to report fever, rash, and enlarged lymph nodes. The NP should suspect:

 

   

serum sickness reaction.

 

   

immediate sensitivity reaction.

 

   

cytotoxic hypersensitivity reaction.

 

   

cell-mediated hypersensitivity reaction.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

Comments:

 

 

Question 50.

Question :

A 70-year-old patient will begin taking cefdinir (Omnicef) for an acute exacerbation of COPD. Before initiating therapy, the primary care NP should order:

 

   

liver function tests (LFTs).

 

   

coagulation studies.

 

   

an electrocardiogram (ECG).

 

   

a creatinine clearance test.

 

Instructor Explanation:

 
 

 

Points Received:

2 of 2

 

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